/* Template Name: Generic Coastal Geoportal */ Sediment Management | California Ocean Protection Council
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Sediment Management

Beach and Coastal Conditions

“Dataset developed by California Coastal Commission’s Melanie Coyne by attaching names to a dynamically segmented coastline using the Department of Navigation and Ocean Development (DNOD) (now Department of Boating and Waterways) 1977 ‘Assessment and Atlas of Shoreline Erosion along the California Coast’ by the State of California Resources Agency. The resulting shapefile only contained starting and ending reference units, coastal type, and common feature names, the following were recently appended: Ownership, Nearshore Description, Shoreline Description, Backshore Description, Development, Role in Littoral Cell, Orientation, Sediment Source, Current Beach Width (FT), Historical Beach Width (FT).”

Beach Sand Deposits

“This is a dataset of beach nourishment history for the California Coastline from the 1920s to 2000. The original data was in tabular form (an Excel spreadsheet) and was compiled by Melanie Coyne while she was a NOAA fellow with the California Coastal Commission in the year 2000, and updated by CSMW in 2008. The original data is included with this dataset and is titled: beach_nourishment_history.xls.The locations of the nourishment projects listed in the table were digitized as points onto a 1:24k shoreline. It is important to note that the exact x and y location of the nourishment project is often unknown, and so the location is an approximation. The data table for this shapefile contains the beach nourishment history data. Each line may represent one or many beach nourishment events, the Date field will list multiple dates if applicable. All files in this dataset were originally projected in NAD83 Teale Albers, reprojected to WGS 1984. The original beach nourishment line shapefile had many truncated values, so in this newer version the field character lengths were increased to accommodate all information from the original source Excel File.”

Littoral Cells

“Littoral cells along the California Coast. Originally digitized by Melanie Coyne from the Assessment and Atlas of Shoreline Erosion Along the California Coast (Habel, J. S. and G. A. Armstrong, 1978). Cells were revised in 2005 by Kiki Patsch to refine certain cells and add sediment budget information.”

Beach Nourishment History (1920s to 2000)

“This is a dataset of beach nourishment history for the California Coastline from the 1920s to 2000. The original data was in tabular form (an Excel spreadsheet) and was compiled by Melanie Coyne while she was a NOAA fellow with the California Coastal Commission in the year 2000, and updated by CSMW in 2008. The original data is included with this dataset and is titled: beach_nourishment_history.xls.The locations of the nourishment projects listed in the table were digitized as points onto a 1:24k shoreline. It is important to note that the exact x and y location of the nourishment project is often unknown, and so the location is an approximation. The data table for this shapefile contains the beach nourishment history data. Each line may represent one or many beach nourishment events, the Date field will list multiple dates if applicable. All files in this dataset were originally projected in NAD83 Teale Albers, reprojected to WGS 1984. The original beach nourishment line shapefile had many truncated values, so in this newer version the field character lengths were increased to accommodate all information from the original source Excel File.”

Sediment Borrow Sites

Offshore Sediment Locations

“Offshore borrow sites as identified originally in the California Shoreline Database compiled by Noble Consultants (Jon Moore). Later updates to the dataset by the Beacon Coastal Sediment Regional Master Plan (CSRMP) for Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, and by Everest International Consultants, Inc. for the Orange County Coastal Regional Sediment Management Plan (2012). This dataset is the lastest version, last updated in October 2012.”

Coastal and Upland Borrow Sites

“Upland debris basins and coastal borrow sites as identified originally in the California Shoreline Database compiled by Noble Consultants (Jon Moore). Later updates to the dataset by the BEACON, SANDAG and AMBAG Coastal Sediment Regional Master Plans (CSRMPs) for Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, San Diego County and Southern Monterey Bay, respectively.The upland borrow sites are from the lastest version of the data, last updated in October 2012. Changes include: added Sed_Source (type of sediment potentially available) and DataSource (identifies from where the data point was most recently identified) attributes. Layer now reflects various types of sediment sources in addition to debris basins, and includes locations from San Diego, Southern Monterey Bay, and Orange County Coastal Regional Sediment Management Plans.Coastal and nearshore sediment borrow sites were added into this dataset in May 2012.Purpose: Upland debris basins and coastal borrow sites as identified originally in the California Shoreline Database compiled by Noble Consultants (Jon Moore). Later updates to the dataset by the BEACON, SANDAG and AMBAG Coastal Sediment Regional Master Plans (CSRMPs) for Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, San Diego County and Southern Monterey Bay, respectively.The upland borrow sites are from the lastest version of the data, last updated in October 2012. Changes include: added Sed_Source (type of sediment potentially available) and DataSource (identifies from where the data point was most recently identified) attributes. Layer now reflects various types of sediment sources in addition to debris basins, and includes locations from San Diego, Southern Monterey Bay, and Orange County Coastal Regional Sediment Management Plans.Coastal and nearshore sediment borrow sites were added into this dataset in May 2012.”

Harbor Borrow Sites

“Harbor locations as identified originally in the California Shoreline Database compiled by Noble Consultants (Jon Moore) for California Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW). Later updates to the dataset were incorporated by John Carotta for CSMW in 2009 and by Everest International Consultants, Inc. for the Orange County Coastal Regional Sediment Management Plan (2012). This dataset is the lastest version, last updated in October 2012.Purpose: Harbor locations as identified originally in the California Shoreline Database compiled by Noble Consultants (Jon Moore) for California Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW). Later updates to the dataset were incorporated by John Carotta for CSMW in 2009 and by Everest International Consultants, Inc. for the Orange County Coastal Regional Sediment Management Plan (2012). This dataset is the lastest version, last updated in October 2012.”

Erosion

Beach Erosion Concern Areas Lines

“Coastal Sediment Management Workgroup (CSMW) efforts are primarily coordinated through development of the California Sediment Master Plan (SMP), which lays out a number of objectives, goals and tasks to implement Regional Sediment Management (RSM) throughout coastal California. A fundamental principle of RSM is the application and placement of sediment within a regional area of the coast to address problems such as eroding beaches. Consequently, the CSMW has determined that the SMP effort needs to identify Beach Erosion Concern Areas (BECAs) where current or historical erosion is of concern to state, federal or local entities, or CSMW members. The list is periodically updated with information from completed Coastal RSM Plans; listing source specifies entities identifying the concern”

Beach Erosion Concern Areas Sites

“Coastal Sediment Management Workgroup (CSMW) efforts are primarily coordinated through development of the California Sediment Master Plan (SMP), which lays out a number of objectives, goals and tasks to implement Regional Sediment Management (RSM) throughout coastal California. A fundamental principle of RSM is the application and placement of sediment within a regional area of the coast to address problems such as eroding beaches. Consequently, the CSMW has determined that the SMP effort needs to identify Beach Erosion Concern Areas (BECAs) where current or historical erosion is of concern to state, federal or local entities, or CSMW members. The list is periodically updated with information from completed Coastal RSM Plans; listing source specifies entities identifying the concern.”

Coastal Change

Northern California Coastal Change

Three historical and one modern vector shorelines and a shore-normal transect for long-term shoreline change rates for sandy shoreline in Northern CA.

Central California Coastal Change

Three historical and one modern vector shorelines and a shore-normal transect for long-term shoreline change rates for sandy shoreline in Central CA.

Southern California Coastal Change

Three historical and one modern vector shorelines and a shore-normal transect for long-term shoreline change rates for sandy shoreline in Southern CA.

Infrastructure

Coastal Armoring

“Coastal armoring along the coast of California, created to provide a database of all existing coastal armoring based on data available at the time of creation. Dataset developed by Jennifer Dare at the California Coastal Commission.”

Coastal Dams

“The National Inventory of Dams (NID) is a congressionally authorized database, which documents dams in the U.S. and its territories. The NID was most recently reauthorized in the Dam Safety Act of 2006. The current NID, published in 2010, includes information on 84,000 dams that are more than 25 feet high, hold more than 50 acre-feet of water, or are considered a significant hazard if they fail. The NID is maintained and published by USACE, in cooperation with the Association of State Dam Safety Officials (ASDSO), the states and territories, and federal dam-regulating agencies. The database contains information about the dam’s location, size, purpose, type, last inspection, regulatory facts, and other technical data. The information contained in the NID is updated approximately every two years.The 2010 NID includes information on approximately 84,000 dams of which 80 percent are regulated by the State Dam Safety Offices and almost 70 percent of the entire inventory is privately-owned dams. The federal government owns only 4% of the total NID, which includes approximately 40% of the tallest dams. From the 2010 NID, 13,990 dams are classified as high hazard potential, 12,662 significant, 57,362 low and 116 undetermined. Dams assigned the high hazard potential classification are those where failure or mis-operation will probably cause loss of human life. Significant hazard potential are those dams where failure or mis-operation results in no probable loss of human life but can cause economic loss. Dams assigned the low hazard potential classification are those where failure or mis-operation results in no probable loss of human life and low economic and/ or environmental losses. Losses are principally limited to the owner’s property. This hazard potential classification does not indicate the condition of the dam. There are approximately 2,000 more dams listed as high hazard potential than the previous NID.”

Sand Retention Structures

“This dataset is a compilation of the UCSC Sand Retention Structures, MC Barriers, and USACE Coastal Structures. UCSC Sand Retention Structures originate from a catalog of 211 man-made structures along California’s open-ocean shoreline. The original database includes the physical attributes of each structure, as well as information pertaining to its coastal setting and history. A determination of the total sandy beach area retained by each structure was based on fillets or salients that are visible in aerial imagery and on the pre-post construction shoreline positions in the proximity of each structure.The lifespans of coastal stabilization, beach restoration and beach nourishment projects may be extended by the presence of man-made structures that act as barriers to littoral drift. An underutilized and cost-effective resource for understanding how these artificial barriers perform is the record of existing structures within California.USACE Coastal Structures were digitized as part of the nation-wide Navigation and Coastal Databank Program, which was concurrently operating in both San Francisco and Los Angeles USACE Districts between 2009 and 2011. This feature class is a compilation of geographic data digitized from various sources, including Coastal Structures Program Project Management Plans and the Enterprise Coastal Inventory Database. This dataset only includes Corps maintained jetties, breakwaters, groins and training walls. MC Barriers were obtained from the Coastal Regional Sediment Management Information System, and was last updated by John Carotta for CSMW in July, 2007. This dataset contained both man-made and natural barriers, mostly headlands. Due to poor attribution and metadata recording keeping, little of the attributes were preserved, and it is unknown where this dataset originated.”